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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: with just a week left before automatic spending cuts are set to begin, the obama administration stepped up pressure on republicans in congress today. the latest warnings came over the potential impact that furloughs would have on air trav, starng in apl. transportation secretary ray lahood said travelers could face new delays of 90 minutes at major airports in chicago, new york and san francisco. more than 100 air control towers at smaller airports could be closed, lahood said. airlines likely would cancel flights. and c
about young's life "the power broker" will be the airing february 18th as part of the pbs series "independent lenses." and we are joined now by his niece who is the producer and executive producer of "the power broker." everybody on my team is watching the film, and let's start with t the number one critique of whitney young in his life and the one that the fillp takes on directly, and that is because he was not marching in the streets and instead working in the board rooms that he was an uncle tom or somehow selling out the civil rights movement, and how does this film make it on and give us a new and reclaimed whitney young? >> well, this film points out that whitney young understood more roles to play and the more sophisticated one got into the movement and everybody understood that, that malcolm x had a role the play and whitney young had a role the play, and it is important that we think in a nuanced way that, you know, everybody's p opiniopinion coul into the mix and move forward so the fact that he was in the board room meant that he was in a different venue and working be
pbs documentary series. earl morris, i think, was the director, i'm not sure, on the prohibition era. he devotes a whole last section of the book, not very long, but the myth of joe kennedy actually being involved in smuggling. he did make money off of alcohol right at the end of prohibition, but technically speaking he was more of a speculator than a smuggler. but somehow, it's interesting, there is this sort of taken for granted mythology that a made the this money bootlegging. no -- >> irish. >> no, the real profiteers in this particular story, um, were the bronsons from canada who bought seagrams and some of the fam family funded respectful institutions in canada. they got their start through prohibition and pushed sometimes aggressively competitors aside. so they had this questionable origins and completely went legit. >> interesting. the california wine industry also got a huge boost from prohibition. they would set out casks with warning labels which said warning after six months, if this liquid is -- this grape juice is allowed to sit for six months, it will become alcohol an
're learning more about the troubled background of adam lanza. a new investigation by pbs finds that lanza was diagnosed with a sensory disorder, was very shy and liked being touched only by his mother. as for the exposure to guns, friends say lanza's mother nancy loved shooting because it helped her bond with her son. >> extraordinary reporting. this is kind of one of the summary graphs of the story, what emerges in this exploration of a still unfolding story is a portrait of a mother apparently devoted but perhaps misguided, struggling to find a place for her son in society. and a boy exceptionally smart in some areas, profoundly deficient in others, who never found a place in the world. >> it's just so sad because of the outcome of this. you think when you look at what happened in their life, you think if she had just made a different decision somewhere along the way, this could have been avoided. and everybody points to the guns, and that being the wrong decision that she made. but perhaps it's not the guns. maybe it's the type of help she got for her son and it wasn't adequate enough.
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)